Jelly Roll Race


Sometimes it’s a colour that catches the attention.  Sometimes it’s a fabric print.  Other times it is a technique that just begs to be tried.  Once in awhile it is a convergence of them all.  Such a convergence happened when I happened upon the fabric palette used in this project.  I always wanted to sew a jelly roll race quilt.  Jelly rolls are pre-cut strips of fabric 2 1/2″ wide and WOF (width of fabric 42-44″)  There is usually 40 strips in a roll.  A race is joining all the pieces together end to end.  Next fold the the long strip in half, right sides together and sew along one edge.  Cut at the fold, press open.  Fold in half, right sides together and repeat.  This is the finished project.  DSC_0336

I had been keeping my eye open for the perfect fabric.  Almost perfect, the polka dots don’t quite fit, but I love the rest.  I’ve decided to name it “Raindrops on Glass.”

This quilt is for my husband’s sister in-law who recently underwent surgery for ovarian cancer.  I really like the way the border and the back co-ordinated with the top.  I quilted it with a varigated thread that has all similar colours in wavy contoured lines.

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DSC_03411 Corinthians 9:24  Do you not know that in a race the runners all compete, but only one receives the prize? Run in such a way that you may win it.

 

 

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11-11-11


I wrote a little earlier, of a father-in-law, a second cousin, an uncle.  One a Canadian, one Polish, one from Great Britain.  I think of my mother, a five-year old when the Canadian soldiers floated up the canals of the Netherlands and brought the sweet taste of her first chocolate bar that became forever linked with liberation and freedom.  I think of Canada’s latest casualty, a classmate of my best friend’s sons and the same age as my own.  The Bible give us God’s word over and over again to remember.  Remember the deeds of the Lord your God and teach them to your children, remember the orphan, the widow, the alien in your midst, “do this in remembrance of Me”.

John 15:13   No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.

It is the verse so often heard this day of days, the day we remember.  Of course Jesus was talking about his life, for all of us, a sacrifice for freedom of a different sort.

I, like many others, am the uneasy pacifist.  Violence is abhorent.  We say it is, want to believe it, but will resort to it in circumstances that seem to suggest there is no other option.  It makes me sad.  I weep for those left, for families, for friends, for children who do not survive their parents, for brides and grooms whose love is lost, for babes in arms who will never know.

I weep every time I watching the photo montage on YouTube of the Highway of Heros.

The photo of the fellow standing on the cement divider is the nemesis of my tears.  That someone would stop on the freeway and show respect in this manner leaves me choking back sobs. I am proud of Canadians, that they would line bridges and highways and sidewalks to acknowledge the call to duty and ultimate price soldiers pay for us.

It is such a waste, such a bloody, ugly, wrenching loss of possibility, that grants us the opportunities and liberties we enjoy so much, that we too often act are our right, that the world owes us.  It is a horrible way to solve differences of opinion, to get what we want, of greed, of acquisition, of political or religious ideology.  Our hope is for peace.  Jesus told us the peacemakers would be blessed, not the peace wishers, or the peace hopers, or the peace brokers, or the peace prayers.  The peacemakers.